IS COLLEGE WORTH THE INVESTMENT? DEPENDS

#CollegeEducation #colleges #education #investments
“If you are sending (your child) here (prestigious college) to get a job, you are sending them to the wrong place.”
That’s the likely response you would get from the admissions director of a prestigious college if you questioned him or her about a return on your investment, according to Maureen Downey, education columnist for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Downey discussed the return on investment for a college degree in a column published Nov. 16, 2021.
Meanwhile, that same day, cnn.com published an analysis by Ronald Brownstein, a CNN political analyst, that concludes that the infrastructure bill approved in Washington that same week is heavily weighted to create jobs for blue-collar, non-college-educated workers.
What should we make of all this? First, college is not for everyone. Most advisers tell young people that college is the key to getting a good job.
But as Downey’s column points out, it largely depends what a student majors in that will determine his or her post-graduation job prospects, and likely salary.
So, especially if you are planning to go into debt to go to college, think long and hard. Some college majors, mostly in the science, technology, engineering and math fields, may be worth it.
Others, particularly in the liberal arts, may not – presuming you are expecting a dollar return on that investment.
But, if you just want an education, and money is not going to be a concern, then college could be a great learning experience and, perhaps, a fun four years.
If you are not suited to college, and are more suited to a trade, there will be a need for plumbers, electricians, carpenters etc., for the foreseeable future.
If neither of these paths suits you, there are a number of programs out there that could give you a potentially lucrative income, without having specific education, experience or background.
These programs, too, may not be for everyone. But if you have ambition, an open mind and are willing to be coached, they may be a very good alternative.
To learn about one of the best such programs, message me.
Education of any sort is never a bad thing. The more one learns, the more one can grow.
But college is expensive and time-consuming. Four years in college is four years of earning little, if anything. You have to see the payoff – not necessarily financial – at the end.
Remember, too, as Downey points out, in general, the more education you have, the more you are likely to earn, vs. the person with less education.
But getting back a lifetime of great earnings in exchange for going through college may not necessarily happen.
Therefore, careful choice is required. You have to know who you are, and who you want to be, to make such a choice.
The same path does not lead everyone to the same destination. Learn where you not only want to go, but also what best would suit you.
There is a path for everyone. Your path may not be the same as your friend’s. You have to find your own way.
Peter

IS AN ECONOMIC BOOM LOOMING?

#EconomicBoom #coronavirus #COVID19 #FlattenTheCurve #MothersDay #WomenInWorkforce
Some experts are predicting a post-pandemic economic boom.
And, after we have just celebrated Mothers’ Day, experts are saying that women workers were hurt the most by the pandemic recession.
Fareed Zakaria predicted on his GPS show May 9, 2021, on CNN that he sees the beginning of an economic boom because of the COVID-19 pandemic subsides and things getting back to normal.
He said that the money put into the system through government aid packages, plus our learning how to do things differently because of the pandemic, is producing conditions that could send the economy soaring.
Certainly, we’ve seen signs of that as businesses reopen and beat the bushes to find help.
The aid has helped businesses and individuals stay afloat during the pandemic, allowing, as they get back to normal, for the potential to prosper.
Meanwhile, ABC’s “This Week with George Stephanopoulos,” featured a Mothers’ Day panel discussing how the pandemic recession affected women in the workforce.
One notable statistic from the recent jobs report says 165,000 women have left the workforce since the pandemic.
The panel, including Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton, Lareina Yee, chief diversity and inclusion officer at McKinsey & Co., and Fatima Goss Graves, CEO and president of the National Women’s Law Center, discussed how women have had to make hard decisions and sacrifices during the pandemic.
As pandemic restrictions ease, the panel said the choices women have had to make was to go back to work – many cannot work from home – or stay home with their children, who may not yet be back in school full time.
The women also discussed how the trend of women leaving the work force has increased since 2000, well before the pandemic, largely because of a “care crisis” that leaves many with no one with whom to leave their children while they work.
As we watch these trends emerge, or continue, many of us will have decisions to make. If you are not seeing the potential for an economic boom from where you sit, you may want to look at other ways to earn an income – even one that could dwarf whatever income you could make at a job.
Or, if you are a woman who hesitates to go back to work because of child care or other issues, there are many programs out there that can allow you to earn a potentially sizeable income from your home, particularly as technology improvements make that task easier.
To check out one of the best such programs, message me.
Obviously, the economy’s performance will depend on whether the pandemic subsides enough to kick everything back into high gear.
It could also depend on whether resources could be provided to enable more women to work outside of the home.
It will depend on how many people get one of the proven vaccines against the coronavirus.
It will still be an individual decision on whether, and what type, of work you could return to. The good news appears that there are more options out there than anyone may realize.
It may also depend on whether you see yourself as an optimist or a pessimist. Here’s a hint: optimists are more likely to succeed.
Peter

MILLIONAIRES CREATED IN BUNCHES

#millionaires #immigrants #frugality
Just about anyone can become a millionaire.
The big difference between those that become millionaires, and those that don’t, is ambition.
Statistics show that one in 100 people in the world will become millionaires, with the ratio increasing with time. One in 10 immigrants to the United States will become millionaires.
In a story aired on CBS’ “60 Minutes” May 7, 2017, CNN’s Anderson Cooper reported on the case of Roberto Beristain, a restaurant owner in Indiana who had come to the U.S. illegally 20 years earlier. He is in the process of being deported, despite having a wife and children who are U.S. citizens. Before all this, those who knew him said he was a job creator, not a job stealer. It appears he was well on his way to becoming a millionaire.
Master investor Warren Buffett, in his February 2017 letter to his Berkshire Hathaway investors, praised “ambitious immigrants” for helping to increase the wealth in America, according to USA Today.
So why are immigrants being demonized?
In certain public discourse, immigrants are described as either moochers, job stealers or potential criminals or terrorists. Certainly, among any human group, you’ll have bad apples. You will have people who will do others harm, or take from others.
The vast majority of immigrants come here either for economic opportunity, or to escape violence, corruption or other evils in their home countries.
When opportunities are given to immigrants, most take advantage of them. They work hard, they learn what they need to do and many of them look for unmet needs and find ways to meet them.
Some come here for education and, yes, stay. They fill lucrative jobs that American talent apparently is not filling. Some do menial jobs that Americans, in large numbers, will not do. In those cases, the immigrants may not be educated, but they have skills Americans, in large numbers, chose not to acquire.
They are creating products that Americans use. Most pay taxes.
When all the immigrants are gone, what will Americans do? Will they be able to fill the jobs they have vacated?
Some areas of the country have seen their populations decrease, because the young people who grew up there see no opportunity for them to succeed. These areas actually want immigrants to move there, to fill vacant housing, and take unfilled jobs.
So, do you want to become a millionaire? It’s not necessarily easy to do, but you have to find an unmet need, or a met need of which you can lower the cost.
You have to be frugal. You have to save and invest properly. Becoming a millionaire may not be an instantaneous process unless, of course, you win the lottery. If you are so lucky, learn to use your money wisely, so you’ll still have a good bit of it when you die. That may require you to grow as a person, as well as having a good investment strategy.
You may have to look for a vehicle to help you become frugal, and perhaps help you to increase your income. To check out one of the best such vehicles, message me.
Millionaires generally are careful with their money. They are looking to spend less, earn more and do what they must to achieve their goal. They do not believe anyone owes them anything they have not worked for.
Do you want to be a millionaire? There’s a difference between wanting it, and doing what you need to do to get it. Most millionaires don’t work for the money. They work for what they can accomplish with the money.
Dolly Parton sings of “a cup of ambition” in the theme for the movie “9 to 5.” You may need more than a cup of ambition to be among the one in a hundred millionaires.
Peter

POLIO DIDN’T STOP NICKLAUS; NOTHING SHOULD STOP YOU #jacknicklaus

Golfer Jack Nicklaus beat polio as a boy to become a champion.
Today, though he holds the record for the number of major tournaments won, he remains humble.
Bob Greene, a commentator for CNN and author of the book “Late Edition: A Love Story,” discussed the Nicklaus way of golf – and life – in an April 4, 2014, column in The Wall Street Journal.
Greene says Nicklaus’ theory for golf and life is to do your best, and everything else will take care of itself. He points out that Nicklaus played in the era of Muhammed Ali and Joe Namath, two athletes known for declaring their own greatness and predicting unpredictable victories.
Nicklaus, though, preferred to let other people declare his greatness, Greene says.
Humility is a scarce character trait in people today. Many who rise to power often tell us of their greatness, even before it is achieved. We need more people who don’t just act before they speak, but prefer not to speak at all. Their actions say all that needs to be said.
They may, or may not, object to having others verbalize their greatness. But they see themselves as a person just doing what he loves, or doing what he believes he was created to do – quietly.
It’s been said that one should put his money where his mouth is. Or, one should walk the walk if he talks the talk. Namath and Ali did that, but Nicklaus did it as he remained quiet.
Humble people don’t talk the talk. They just walk the walk. They put their money where it belongs, not near their mouths.
They give and get, and never take. They do their thing without expectation, though they expect much from themselves quietly.
Have you ever had a bombastic boss? How did he treat you, his employee? Did he take a lot from you, while giving you little? Did he make you feel as if he were doing you a favor by employing you? Did you feel that he was more comfortable being served, than serving?
We all have the ability to gain wealth and/or power. How we get it says as much, or more, about a person as the achievement itself.
Humble people accomplish things quietly, yet openly. They accomplish things honestly and give generously. They favor the accomplishment itself, and what it can do for others, rather than what it can do for them. They don’t talk of greatness. They Just Do It, to quote the Nike slogan – and do for others.
Do you consider yourself humble? Do you have goals that you don’t talk about with others, but hold deep inside? Are you genuinely kind to others, and eager to do for others, even when no one is watching?
If so, and are looking for a way to put that genuine goodness to use, visit www.bign.com/pbilodeau. You may find the best thing you can do to help others, and perhaps achieve what you’d like for yourself.
Successful people do more and talk less. Like Nicklaus, they take life one shot at a time. Then, go to the next shot. They do their best each time, all the time. They always give credit to others. As Greene put it, Nicklaus believed his major tournament record would have been broken by now. But, at age 74, he still leads in the clubhouse.
Peter
#jacknicklaus

A NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: MEET MORE PEOPLE NOT LIKE ME

We all have a (pick one: world, culture, environment) that we grew up in.
For most of us, nearly everyone in that milieu was pretty much like us. We shared the same beliefs. We had similar goals in life, even if our ways to pursue those goals might have been different.
That milieu is part of who we are. But, it’s not the “whole” world.
Keel Hunt, a columnist for the Tennessean newspaper in Nashville, talked about how diversity has been the key to that city’s prosperity. His new year’s resolution is to meet at least one person who is not like him. He discussed this in a Jan. 5, 2014, column.
Certainly, in his profession, Hunt meets a lot of folks not like him. But not everyone can say that.
Many people never leave the world in which they grew up. They never experience the culture, environments and worlds that others grew up in. Perhaps, if their children attend a school with students who are not like them, they move their children to a more homogeneous school.
This type of behavior breeds intolerance. But, today, “intolerance” has taken on new meanings.
When “Duck Dynasty’s” Phil Robertson talks about his religious and racial beliefs in public, or when a large group of people petition to have CNN’s Piers Morgan deported because of his views on gun control, it makes us re-examine what “intolerance” is.
“Intolerance” today has been comingled with free speech. Those who protest the views of Robertson and Morgan don’t watch them in large numbers. They are speaking largely to an audience of their peers, in terms of their beliefs. Those who disagree with them turn them off. It should come as no surprise that Robertson and Morgan believe what they believe.
Even though you may not agree with what they believe, or say in public, every person has to defend Robertson’s and Morgan’s rights to believe it and say it. If you disagree, turn them off. If enough people turn them off, they will pay a price not for believing what they believe, but expressing it so boldly in public.
If you follow Hunt’s idea and begin to meet people who are not like you, you may learn something. Neither you, nor they, should expect that either of your beliefs, customs, traditions etc., will change. But, neither party should presume the other is “wrong.”
We all are better people when we become an active part of the world. It takes all kinds of people to make a world, to quote an old adage. Many people in the world are different from you. They mean you no harm, in most cases. If they mean you harm, stay away from them. If you mean them harm, shame on you. Certainly, in most cultures or belief systems, most of us are taught to respect one another. There are a few cultures that teach children to avoid people because of what they look like, talk like or behave like – even when they are not misbehaving.
We learn from others. We should make it a point to learn ABOUT others. We should make it a point to live peacefully and respectfully among others who are not like us. And, yes, we should fight for the right of others to be who they are, as long as they mean no harm.
You can’t do much about others’ behavior, but you can start with your own. Believe what you want to believe, but learn more about others. You can help make the world a happier, healthier and more prosperous place for everyone. Eventually, blessings will come back to you in ways you may have never expected.
So, if you haven’t made it a practice to meet people who are not like you, try just meeting one such person. Don’t try to make him or her believe what you believe. It will never work. Instead, listen more and talk less. Each of you may learn more about each other and, perhaps, become friends. What a great world it would be if we could believe what we believe, and have an abundance of friends who are different from us.
Also, if you are well-known person, believing what you believe is certainly OK. And you are certainly free to talk about what you believe. But you might take a little extra care in how, and in what venue, you express your beliefs.
Peter

P.S. If you and your friends – those like you and those not like you – want to become prosperous, visit www.bign.com/pbilodeau. See how communities of friends of all types learn to prosper, and grow as people, by helping each other.