WE LOVE VACATIONS, BUT SHOULDN’T WE BE WORKING?

#vacations #vacation #working #jobs

Ah, vacation.

We work so hard for it.

We wouldn’t want to be on vacation all the time, would we?

Brian O’Connor, a philosophy professor at University College in Dublin, Ireland, took on this subject in an article published April 29, 2018, in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“Although annual leave is a right in many workplaces, it is of significant value to employers, too,” O’Connor writes.

Studies urge employers to embrace paid leave, the article says. It refreshes workers, and gives employers opportunities to expose others, who would do the work of the vacationer, to other jobs in the company, thus gaining workers with more diverse skills, O’Connor writes.

O’Connor’s point: vacations are designed as a respite from work, but we all need to be working, rather than being on vacation all the time.

Let’s break this down further. First, as employees, most of us get paid time off in a variety of fashions. There is vacation time, which tends to increase with years of service – up to a maximum, of course.

Then, there is sick time which, in theory, is there to use as needed for illness or other emergencies.

Finally, for those with certain jobs, there is paid time to attend educational seminars, specific offsite training etc.

Some employees will abuse some of this time off, particularly sick time. We’ve all heard the expression of calling in well. Sick time, of course, should ONLY be an insurance policy for illness and emergencies, and should be used only when necessary. Mental health days, unless they are for a specific diagnosed condition, should not be taken. (People with a diagnosed mental condition may have fewer employment opportunities).

Some people don’t get any of this paid time off, despite the encouragement to employers to provide it.

Others are generously paid for NOT using their time off when they retire.

Others, depending on the job they have, are literally punished for taking time off. They have to work extra hours prior to leaving on vacation, and face a huge pile of work when they return. Others can just comfortably go on vacation, without added pressures or work before and after.

With today’s technology, some can take the job with them on vacation. If you are one of those, you may need to set some new priorities.

Though O’Connor’s article argues that vacations are merely a rest from toil, and that toil is something that doesn’t please you, it can be argued that a permanent vacation – or a change in your life – may be needed. There are many vehicles out there that, for a few part-time non-job hours a week, can give you the freedom to change your life for the better. To check out one of the best, message me.

Despite the nobility of labor, if you don’t enjoy what you do, or if what you do does not provide you with the life you want, it may behoove you to look at alternatives.

Your personal goal should be to go on your longest vacation ever – retirement – as soon as you are able. In today’s work world, that decision sometimes can be made for you.

Peter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *