BOOMERANG KIDS COME BACK TO CHANGE PARENTS’ LIVES

#BoomerangKids @AdultsLivingWithParents #EmptyNest
“Boomerang kids.”
These are the young adult children who move back home with Mom and Dad either because they don’t want, or can’t afford, to live on their own.
Of parents whose adult children returned in the last year, 68 percent reported more stress, and 53 percent said they were less happy.
That’s according to an article by Erin Arvedlund for The Philadelphia Inquirer. The article was also published Aug. 7, 2017, in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
One in nine parents surveyed by Fidelity and Stanford University’s Center on Longevity reported having children who moved back home in adulthood, the article says.
Not only were most of the parents more stressed and less happy about that, 46 percent of mothers reported worse sleeping and weight gain, the article quotes the study.
The study, as quoted in the article, also reports that more 18- to 35-year-olds live with parents than with a spouse.
To prevent adult children from moving home, some parents are resorting to buying houses for the children, the article says.
It may be oversimplification to pinpoint causes for this, but let’s start with the economy. After the 2008 meltdown, jobs, even for young people, became scarcer. Those that did get jobs don’t make the kind of money to would allow them to live on their own.
The article also points out that some of these adult children are moving back with children of their own, so divorce, or having children outside of marriage, plays a part.
It’s hard for many of us in a different generation even resorting to moving back home for any length of time, no matter the circumstances. But these younger folks don’t see it as a problem, perhaps because their life at home was so good.
As Kelly Yamanouchi reported in the Oct. 24, 2017, edition of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the average pay for Delta Air Lines flight attendants is $25,000 a year. It’s tough for a young adult to pay rent, eat and otherwise have a decent life today on that salary.
It still begs the question of how one has a social life around Mom and Dad, and how Mom and Dad work a social life around adult kids at home.
From the parents’ viewpoint, money that you give to your children is money you probably won’t have to retire on.
Undoubtedly, it’s not an easy decision to turn away your children in times of trouble. Many of them don’t have the opportunities for earning a living that their parents had, because there are fewer good jobs.
If you are a young adult contemplating moving home, for financial reasons or otherwise, remember that there are more ways to make an income, potentially a great income, than a W-2 job. To check out one of the best, message me.
If you are a parent getting set to take in an adult child, try to discern the real reason they want to move home, and try to help them find an alternative – perhaps short of buying them a house – to moving back home.
Parents and adult children living under one roof can create so much tension, simply because each has his or her own way of doing things. Neither parents nor children need that stress.
It’s good for adults to live on their own when possible. It helps the economy and society as a whole. Make sure that if you have to move back in with Mom and Dad, that it will be very temporary, and for the right reasons.
Peter

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