COLLEGE DEBT CRUSHING MANY STUDENTS

#CollegeGraduates #CollegeDebt #CollegeStudents

One graduate has resorted to selling her eggs to help infertile women.

She is one of many college graduates who have huge college debt and not enough income to easily pay it off.

Her story and others were relayed by Kala Kachmar of the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press in an article also published in the May 8, 2016, edition of The Tennessean in Nashville as part of its USA Today supplement.

About $2 million borrowers bear a $1.3 trillion loan burden, the headline reads.

“Who wants to live at home at 29? I don’t. But, luckily, I can. … I shouldn’t be living paycheck to paycheck,” the article quotes Christyn Gionfriddo of Neptune, N.J.

Let’s examine what has happened. We have gotten constant messages for decades that to get a good job, one needs a good education – a college degree. Colleges and the government have made it easier for students of all income levels to get into college.

Some of the vehicles used to facilitate students getting into college involve loans that students are not obligated to begin repaying until after graduation.

In theory, this plan works if students can convert their educations into a good-paying job.

That doesn’t always happen.

Therefore, students are graduating with huge debt that may be difficult to repay, if their incomes can’t support it.

Some, in fact, will try to avoid repaying it.

What’s a young person to do?

First, determine in your high school years, whether college is right for you.

It’s certainly a nice goal to have EVERYONE get a college degree, but today’s economics require a more in-depth thought process for each student.

Ask yourself, if you go to college, what is the goal when you graduate? What kind of income will you be likely to earn with your degree? Will you need loans to get through school? What is the likelihood of you getting a job in your chosen field immediately after graduation? Will it be enough for you to live a decent life, and pay off your debt?

If you’ve determined that college is worthwhile enough to borrow money for, then watch your spending while in school. You may have to forgo some good times, get a part-time job and otherwise be somewhat miserly. Watch every dime you spend and make sure it is worthwhile.

If you determine that college may not be right for you, don’t fret. There are other ways to make an income without having to worry about what kind of job you have. For one of the best, visit www.bign.com/pbilodeau. You’ll see people of all income and education levels spending less, and potentially earning enough to pay off any debt promptly.

In short, don’t view going to college as an automatic decision. Don’t view your education as an interlude to be young, boisterous and have a good time. Because, when you grow up, there could be a big debt welcoming you to adulthood.

Colleges don’t care what happens to you once you get out. But you should take that into account before deciding whether to go to college.

Peter

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