WHOM DO YOU TRUST?

#trust #retirement #saving
America has an issue with trust, and it’s getting worse.
So said a headline in the Feb. 14, 2016, edition of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
The headline was over an article by Gail MarksJarvis, personal finance columnist with The Chicago Tribune, and author of “Saving for Retirement Without Living Like a Pauper or Winning the Lottery.”
MarksJarvis wrote about Richard Edelman, president of the Edelmen public relations firm. He spoke to a group of CEOs about trust, and why fewer and fewer people are trusting big institutions, be they government, corporations or other large entities.
“Economists have been troubled throughout the recovery (from the 2008 economic collapse) that even though incomes were slowly rising and households should have more pocket money now that gas prices are low, spending hasn’t followed the expected trend. Consumers are increasing their saving and being careful about spending,” MarksJarvis writes.
Of course, the CEOS want to know about this because they want to sell more of their products and services. They want to know how to get people to part with more of their purses’ contents.
Remember, a few years before the collapse, we were told that people weren’t saving enough? After the collapse, for many, saving became even more difficult, so we still have a real problem with people not having nearly enough put away for retirement, or even enough for emergency expenses that are crucial to life.
Now that some of those folks are “recovering,” they are beginning to save more. This has to be good for most of us, albeit not so good for businesses.
Who would have thought that the big drop in gasoline prices would have Wall Street in a tailspin? Turns out that companies who went out looking for new sources of oil, natural gas etc., borrowed lots of money to do it. Now, as oil prices have sunk, these companies are having difficulty paying their debts back. That’s having an effect throughout the economy.
Through all this, it seems, Americans have become jaded and have no faith that the institutions of community are looking out for them. It’s certainly OK to be skeptical, but when skepticism turns to cynicism, everyone, eventually, gets hurt.
The lesson here is to look for people and institutions you feel you can trust, and work with them. Continue to spend carefully, and save aggressively. Also know that no matter how much money a corporation makes or saves, your job, if you have one, could still be in peril.
If you are scared, or angry, at what you see happening in the country or around the world, take a breath. Americans still have a great capacity for turning miserable circumstances into wonderful success. If you’d like to be part of that turnaround, and see yourself as success waiting to happen, visit www.bign.com/pbilodeau. You’ll find stories of people from all walks of life who have turned their difficult circumstances into powerful success.
As the title of MarksJarvis’ book suggests, you CAN save for retirement without impoverishing yourself or winning the lottery. It takes discipline and careful spending – things Americans seem to be doing.
Sometimes one has to look hard to find someone, or some institution, he or she can trust to look out for him or her. They are out there, but one has to keep looking and not get discouraged.
Peter

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