SANTA CLAUS: THE PLEASURE AND PERIL OF A CEO

#SantaClaus #SantasWorkshop #LeadershipSecrets
Imagine Santa Claus as the CEO of his workshop.
He has to hire elves, reindeer and other workers to manufacture toys, and deliver all of them on one night every year.
He has to put the right elves, reindeer etc., in the right jobs. He has to be acutely aware of the growing and changing toy demand. He has to make sure that deliveries are made, on schedule, every time on that one night – the same night EVERY year.
Eric Harvey, in his book “The Leadership Secrets of Santa Claus: How to Get Big Things Done in Your Workshop … All Year Long,” writes about running a business from Santa’s perspective. The book contains all the things you might expect in a how-to –be-a-leader book.
Two of them, however, are noteworthy. Harvey advises to teach people not just how to do a job properly, but also how to be successful. He uses Ian, whom Santa hired as the EICOT (Elf In Charge of Training) to illustrate the point.
As Harvey tells it, Ian asked Santa a few questions before he was hired. “Is an elf really successful if he or she just makes good toys, but doesn’t get along with others and communicates poorly? Is a reindeer really successful if he or she pulls hard but isn’t a team player who helps others succeed? Are any of us truly successful if we’re good at our crafts, but display negative attitudes or fail to solve problems effectively?”
In other words, being good at what you do isn’t just about mastering the skill to which you are assigned. Being successful means being part of a team, and teams accomplish more than individuals. You’ve probably run into or worked with people who were good at what they did, but you would never choose to work with them.
Or, you’ve run into a manager that didn’t treat you as you would want to be treated. That person may have been “good” in his or her boss’ eyes, but he or she didn’t help you improve, or treat you with the respect you deserved.
A second illustrative point in Harvey’s book talks about red wagons. Decades ago, a red wagon was on many children’s Christmas list, and the elves became good at making them. Suddenly, demand changed and computer games became more in vogue. The workshop had to be retooled to make the video games, much to the chagrin of the elves, who were great at making wagons.
The point here is that change will come. You don’t know when or how in advance, but it will come. Even the best wagon maker will have to do something else, because the market for wagons has dried up. If that something else doesn’t suit you, you may need a Plan B for the rest of your life. To check out one of the best, visit www.bign.com/pbilodeau. Not only will you see examples of people changing their lives, you will learn principles of success for you, and how you can help others succeed.
You can be the leader that Santa is, as Harvey illustrates. It will come with ups and downs. You may not have to gear up for a single night every year, but you can learn what it takes to run your own workshop in a manner that will lead to the most success.
At this time of year, we reflect not only on what we have done, but also what we have done, and can do, for others.
So Merry Christmas, happy holidays and the best for 2016. May you get your workshop humming in a way that brings you, and others, success.
Peter

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