HOUSING MYTHS

#housing #LowIncomeHousing #poverty #gentrification
There are three myths in the housing market.
First, gentrification has as much to do with morals as with economics. Second, there is more poverty in cities than suburbs. Third, having low-income housing in one’s community reduces property values.
Darcel Rockett discussed these myths in an article for the Chicago Tribune, that was also published Dec. 18, 2017, in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Since the term gentrification has many connotations, we won’t spend a lot of time discussing it. Suffice it to say, “We need to take the depth of ethical and moral disgust out of the name gentrifier, so that we can get people together and say this is something that we are a part of, but it’s also something bigger than us …. So how do we move forward?” Rockett quotes John Joe Schlichtman, an associate professor of sociology at DePaul University.
But let’s dive deeper into the other two. Poverty exists everywhere. It’s not an urban problem, suburban problem or a rural problem. Especially since the 2008 recession, you have many people who were once considered “middle class” suddenly without a job, or, suddenly losing their homes.
For some, one or both of those events can create instant poverty, regardless of where one lives.
Secondly, there are many people moving from the suburbs to the cities, essentially gentrifying some urban neighborhoods.
“The number of poor persons in suburban Chicago eclipsed the number in the City of Chicago in the last decade, and there are no signs of this trend reversing anytime soon,” Rockett quotes Scott Allard, a professor at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington.
That brings us to low-income housing’s effect on housing prices. Rockett quotes a 2016 Stanford Graduate School of Business analysis that reviewed low-income developments nationwide, funded by the low-income housing tax credit program. The impact of that housing on surrounding property values varied based on neighborhoods’ economic state and the number of minority residents, Rockett quotes the study.
“What the study finds is that the effects of putting one of these (low-income housing developments) in a neighborhood depends on the pre-existing conditions in that neighborhood,” Rockett quotes Anthony DeFusco, assistant professor of finance at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.
What all of this tells us is that housing – just one segment of the overall economy – cannot be stereotyped. “Instead of building housing and targeting it” to people with income below a certain level, “if you just build more housing, and housing was more plentiful overall, prices in general would be lower and would be more affordable for everyone,” Rockett quotes DeFusco.
Are you living where you want to be living? If not, is it because of finances? Perhaps you need to look at ways to make more money that doesn’t involve a second W-2 job. There are many ways out there to earn extra money – perhaps even surpass the income from your primary job – by spending a few part-time, off-work hours a week. To check out one of the best such vehicles, message me.
As the article intimates, it doesn’t matter how you label housing. Housing comes in all types and price ranges. You should be able to choose the housing, and location, that’s right for you. The more housing options available, the more affordable all housing becomes.
So, here’s hoping you are living where you want, in a place just right for you. Remember, too, that a house is a house. A home is created by the people living in it.
Peter

WORK UNTIL YOU ARE 70? REALLY?

#SuzeOrman #WorkUntilAge70 #retirement
Suze Orman has made a fine career of giving retirement and other financial advice.
But when she advises people to work until age 70, Wes Moss, who writes the Money Matters column in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and also has a radio show of the same name on WSB AM, begs to differ.
Moss discussed the matter in a Nov. 7, 2017, column.
Certainly, medical advances and the like have made living longer possible. Some folks may even enjoy their work to the point of never thinking about giving it up. Others may believe that the longer they are able to keep working, the better off they will be financially.
Moss points out that the latter is pretty much Orman’s philosophy. He quotes an old joke in financial circles: “How do you never run out of money for retirement? Work until you die,” Moss writes.
In Moss’ mind, perhaps the most important reason for not setting 70 as a retirement age is that “you may lose the sweet spot of your retirement – the years when you are healthy and active enough to live out your post-career dreams to the fullest,” he writes.
Certainly, the Social Security Administration has inched up the “full retirement” age to 67 from 65, where it was for decades. But Moss points to a Bloomberg News article that says Americans are retiring later, dying sooner and are sicker in between.
Here’s something else Moss points out: companies largely do not want older workers around. Younger workers are generally cheaper. So, even as workers approach middle age, they become vulnerable to being forced out of their jobs for one reason or another.
If you are among those who are nearing retirement, and don’t have lots of money saved, take heart. There are many ways out there you can make money in your spare time, say, a couple hours a week, without taking a second W-2 job, or working overtime (if available) in your first job. To check out one of the best such vehicles, message me.
In short, unless you really love your job, think about retiring as soon as you are able. If you can foresee your job going away before you want it to, take measures to soften the blow when it comes. If you do the right things – spend less without depriving yourself, save more money, invest well etc. – you might even be able to walk out of your job with a smile.
As Moss says, you shouldn’t make it a goal to sacrifice the best years of your retirement by working those extra years. And, once you do retire, you shouldn’t waste time sitting at home, and not venturing out of your comfort zone. Have dreams. Fulfill them. Retire with no prejudices, no pretenses and no burdensome obligations.
That isn’t to say that there are some jobs that are so great, you don’t want to give them up unless you have to. But, chances are, no matter how good you are at what you do, eventually your employer is going to want you gone.
If you’re lucky, when your employer wants you gone, he or she will offer you a package to leave. If you get an offer like that, remember that few people who take them ultimately regret that decision. If you are being paid to leave, the message you should hear is that the employer want you out.
So, if you are a Suze Orman devotee, remember that not everyone agrees that one should work until he or she is 70. A better philosophy might be this: when is the SOONEST I can retire? Once you’ve determined that, think about not only how you are going to pull it off financially, but also what you will do with your new-found time.
Work, dream, save and retire.
Peter

WHICH SIDE OF THE QUADRANT DO YOU WANT TO BE ON?

#CashFlowQuadrant #RobertKiyosaki #employee #BusinessOwner #investor
The Cash Flow Quadrant.
The concept was created by Robert Kiyosaki, author of the “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” series, among other works.
Basically, Kiyosaki divides all of us, financially, of course, into one of four squares, forming a quadrant. In the two squares on the left side are the people who work hard for their money. In the two squares on the right side are the people who have systems or money that work hard for them.
Let’s look at the left side. The top quadrant is labeled E, for employee. Here are the people who have jobs in which they work hard to make someone else rich. These folks basically trade their time and effort for dollars. The amount of money they get depends on what someone else is willing to give them.
The second quadrant on the left side is labeled S, for solo practitioner, or self-employed, depending on how you look at it. These folks, too, trade their time and effort for dollars, but the amount they get paid can depend on how much time they want to put in, and how much in demand their service is. Though they pay themselves, largely, few of these folks get rich. Hopefully, they are able to set aside some money for insurance, retirement etc.
Moving to the right side of the quadrant, the top square is labeled B, for business owner. Kiyosaki said his “rich dad” called this quadrant B for big business or Bill Gates. Kiyosaki defines a big business as having 500 employees or more.
“Unlike the S, they don’t want to run the company by themselves. They want smart people to run the company for them,” Kiyosaki writes.
The B folks also could have large networks that can help them put gobs of money in their pockets. They may not own a large, bricks-and-mortar business, but they have big organizations that they’ve cultivated, and not only get rich themselves, but do so by helping others get rich in the process.
The fourth square in the quadrant is I, for investor. These are the folks who’ve accumulated lots of money, and are watching it grow exponentially through investing. Think of the “Sharks” on the TV show, “Shark Tank,” as a good example of people who are I’s.
Obviously, the object of the economy, as we in the U.S. know it, is to move more people from the left side of the quadrant to the right side.
Easier said than done, you might ask? Obviously, one can’t move freely from the left to the right. Certain things have to happen – or, better yet, YOU have to make certain things happen.
First and foremost, a person must WANT to move from the left to the right. That desire must be powerful enough to make him do whatever it takes to move – and take however long it takes to move.
Wealth accumulation requires discipline and sacrifice. You might have to give up some of life’s pleasures to get where you want to be. Take your lumps now, and take your pleasure later, as it were. It also, often, requires patience. Sure, there are some folks who inherit a lot of money and become instant investors. Big lottery winners can become instant investors, but often don’t have the discipline to do so. Therefore, many just spend their winnings until they run out of money.
You can also spend years toiling on the left side of the quadrant, putting away a little at a time and never touching it. That requires a good deal of patience.
So, how do you get from the left to the right side of the quadrant in your current situation? You may not need 500 employees, but if you have a big enough desire to move, there are many vehicles that can potentially get you there. To learn about one of the best, message me.
Meanwhile, if you are among those who criticize those who have more money than you, and you continue to toil on the left side of the quadrant, you may need an attitude adjustment, f you want to go to the other side. You may also need a big-enough desire to join, rather than beat, those you now criticize.
A move to the right side of the quadrant could be possible if you BELIEVE you can get there.
Peter

FEAR OF RETIREMENT

#retirement #FearOfRetirement #boredom #RetirementFinancing
Are you afraid of retirement?
Does the thought of not working anymore create anxiety?
Are you postponing retirement, even though you know you should retire, because of your fear?
There may be lots of reasons people fear retirement. The biggest, perhaps, is financial. Perhaps loss of a paycheck would crush you. Perhaps you haven’t saved enough, and your pension, if you are lucky enough to have one, plus Social Security may not be enough for you to live the way you want.
Another fear may be boredom. You may say things like, “what am I going to do with myself?” Perhaps you don’t have a hobby or hobbies to occupy your time. Perhaps you fear what you might become by just hanging out, day in and day out.
Retirement experts have advice on both counts. Most say that retirement without the financial backing would be difficult. One way to determine whether you have enough to retire on is to look at your savings. Without touching your principal, are the dividends, interest and capital gains those savings produce, combined with other income such as a pension or Social Security, be enough for you to live on?
When we talk about “living” in retirement, it should be more than just survival. You should be able to have the money to do things you like to do, perhaps things you never had time to do while you were working.
If you think about this while you are young, you can plan accordingly. If you are older, and are at or close to a reasonable retirement age, and believe you won’t be financially secure in retirement, you may as well keep working as long as your employer will keep you. Remember, though, that you could walk into work one day, and be shown the door.
Let’s examine the time factor. If you believe you’ll be bored in retirement, there are many activities available to occupy your time. There are countless volunteer opportunities, for example. Before you retire, find an activity that would interest you. There should be no reason anyone has difficulty occupying his time.
There are some solutions that would both occupy your time and give you a potentially great income. To check out one of the best, message me.
In this day and age, retirement decisions are often made FOR people. Employers who reorganize, downsize or otherwise want older workers gone use many tactics to get people to leave. If they don’t leave voluntarily, the employer will find some reason to terminate them. Most employees don’t have recourse against the employer, and most older workers will have trouble finding new employment in their professional fields.
Older workers are supposed to be protected by labor laws, but creative employers will find ways to force them out.
The lesson in all this is that one should prepare for retirement as soon as he starts his career. Unlike decades ago, when job security was more prevalent, there is no real job security in any field today. A worker is one reorganization, or one bad manager, away from a dead career.
If you can work until you want to leave on your terms, you are among the very fortunate. More than likely, your retirement decision will be made for you.
If you are at a good retirement age and fear retirement, you may be wise – especially if you see things in your workplace that seem stacked against you – to retire as soon as you are able. Know that it won’t be hard to find things to occupy your time. In fact, you’ll probably find it amazing that you had time to work.
Peter

PREPARE FOR COSTLY REPAIRS

#HomeRepairs #MoneyForHomeRepairs #RainyDayFund
It’s been said that if your (pick one: car, refrigerator, heating system) breaks down, you’ll always find the money to fix it.
That is true as long as you are prepared financially.
Erica Lamberg discussed preparing for costly home repairs in an article for GOBanking.com. It was also published in the Nov. 13, 2017, edition of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Some people have a rainy day fund for such things. Others, who are not prepared, have to do without until they can come up with a way to pay for the repair.
As one can attest, it’s tough to live more than a few hours without your car, refrigerator or heating system.
Lamberg also talks about unexpected roof repairs. As she advises, though a roof is supposed to last 30 years, don’t wait that long to take preventative action. “A new roof, for an average-sized home – using medium-priced asphalt shingles – can cost at least $5,000 in most parts of the country, assuming that the sheathing is still sound,” Lamberg quotes Timothy G. Wiedman, a retired professor of management from Doane University in Nebraska.
She writes that Wiedman, who has bought, maintained, upgraded and sold several homes, said homeowners would be wise to start putting $600 to $700 a year into a roof replacement fund.
As for your heating system, Lamberg advises regular maintenance by a good local HVAC contractor. Twice a year, at the beginning of the heating and the beginning of the cooling seasons, is recommended.
“The proactive approach of being ready for the eventual changing of your equipment will save you money,: Lamberg quotes Gene Amick, with Climate Control Heating near Kansas City, Mo.
There are a number of things around your home that wear out over time. Sometimes, just regular maintenance helps prolong the life of those things. Other times, as in the case of your roof, or perhaps, your refrigerator, it’s best to have a fund that you can tap when replacement time comes.
Sometimes, having an income source that can help you pay for those things is warranted. There are a number of ways out there to earn extra money without having to get another traditional job, or begging your boss for raises. To check out one of the best – and you may find ways to save on new appliances and cars, too – message me.
Avoiding unexpected breakdowns is not just a money issue. It involves paying attention to things. The easiest way to get financially hammered by an unexpected repair is to ignore things. If you have a storm, particularly a hail storm, have your roof inspected. If you are lucky enough to have a good homeowner’s insurance policy, you might be able to get that new roof paid for.
Have your car regularly maintained. Regular oil changes over several years are cheaper than buying a new car. A good rule of thumb for vehicles is not only to get regular maintenance, but also to do the math on repairs. If the repairs become too frequent and expensive, a new car may be in order.
Most people do save for new cars, and plan their new-car purchases. But for those unexpected breakdowns, make sure you have a fund to cover the repairs.
Don’t let unexpected household repairs or purchases break you. Plan ahead. Have a source of funds readily available so you don’t have to do without for too long.
Peter

WORKING TO HELP OTHERS WILL ULTIMATELY ENRICH YOU

#success #HelpingOthers #BecomeWhatYouThink
It’s been said that one may be in business for himself, but not by himself.
In almost everything we do, others play a part.
We can choose to USE others for our own gain, to their detriment. Or, we can choose to help others succeed, hence we succeed.
“In helping others, we shall help ourselves. For whatever good we give out completes the circle and comes back to us,” says Flora Edwards, a South African-born industrialist.
Edwards’ words are among the array of wisdom nuggets in the book, “The Power of Positive Doing: Getting Good at Getting Results,” by BJ Gallagher, with a forward by Ken Blanchard.
Too many of us have worked for people who depended on our success, but were indifferent about us. We, in essence, were a tool in their toolbox. THEIR success was all that mattered to them. If we became successful in the process, so be it. If we didn’t (read: we did the work but didn’t get paid what we deserved), it was of no matter to them.
Like any tool, if we left, or broke beyond repair, they replaced us.
The true situation we would all like to be in was working WITH someone who had a vested interest in our success. They would have so much of a vested interest, in fact, that they would do whatever they had to do to ensure our success.
Those folks, it seems, are few and far between.
But, as a person, one cannot focus on what others may do to you, or for you.
One must focus more on what one can do for others. Whom do you want to help? Whom do you want to succeed? If you begin to think that way, success will come to you in good time.
Success may not be instantaneous. Favors may not be overtly returned immediately. But the right attitude and subsequent action by you will bring the eventual results you are looking for.
OK, it’s nice to think that way, but, as a practical matter, how does one achieve what he thinks about?
Perhaps your current job doesn’t allow you the flexibility to help the people you want to be successful.
There are several vehicles out there that, with a little part-time effort outside of your job, you can help others achieve success, and you, in turn, can be successful. To check out one of the best, message me.
Gallagher’s book focuses on not just thinking right, but taking the action needed to make what you are thinking happen.
Too many folks have the right ideas, but are afraid to act on them because, for example, they were raised to look for security, rather than take bold steps toward their dream.
Others fail to act out of fear of what others may think of them. As most successful people will tell you, being successful may require you to be different from the rest.
So, go forth and help others. Your rewards may not be immediate or obvious, but eventually, they will come in abundance.
Peter

RURAL AREAS NEED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, BUT …

#RuralAmerica #EconomicDevelopment #jobs #employment
Rural areas want to boost their economy.
They want to attract companies/employers who can employ lots of people who are now out of work for a variety of reasons – not the least of which is where they live.
Kyle Wingfield, a columnist for The Atlanta Journal Constitution, took on this issue, as it applies to rural Georgia, in an Aug. 27, 2017, column.
“There are a lot of different factors that affect the quality (of the workforce),” Wingfield quotes Amy Lancaster, director of workforce development for the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce. “The education system is a big piece of that … but the opioids (epidemic), criminal justice reform – all those things have a big impact, so it’s hard to limit or confine it to one issue or agency,” the quote continued.
Regarding the education system, Wingfield discussed the community college system with Lancaster. “The course offerings may not be aligned with local demand, at least not from the employer side,” Wingfield quotes her. In other words, what the employers want the students to learn is not what the students themselves want to take.
She told Wingfield that there are no incentives for colleges, either two-year or four-year, to offer what the employers really need students to learn.
Let’s break this down further. Rural areas, be they in Georgia or any other state, have a distinct disadvantage to urban areas in terms of attracting employers. It’s difficult to attract the type of talent employers seek because the workers they want to attract, usually young and fairly educated, don’t want to move to a rural area. They look for the multitude of life options urban areas provide in abundance. And those workers already living in rural areas may not be the type of workers Company X needs.
Secondly, though there is relatively high unemployment in rural areas, it doesn’t appear that people are willing to do what it takes to become more employable. In other words, if a company needs, say, welders, and people are not willing to take the necessary training to become a welder, there’s a mismatch between the supply of employable people and the demand for the needed skills.
From the worker’s perspective, he may think, “is it worth my time to get the extra training that Company X wants me to have, only to find that a year or two later, the employer demands something else – or needs to reduce staff — and I’m no longer needed?”
Many workers who thought they had secure jobs have lost them, so it’s easy to figure out why they would ask whether the extra training and effort would be worth it in the long run.
An example might be truck driving. Would a prospective new truck driver want to go through all the training that it might take, only to discover a few years later that his company will be going to driverless vehicles?
Welders may be in demand now, but will they be replaced by robots later?
It’s a tough position all around. But, if you are a prospective worker who is examining what to do with your life, you might want to think outside the box. There are plenty of ways out there to make a potentially sizeable income, without a W-2 job, if you are open to checking them out. To learn about one of the best, message me.
If you are an employer, consider that workers willing to be retrained for the skills you need now will want some assurance that they will be able to adapt as your technology changes. And, in fact, that they will still be welcome as needs change. So, it’s not only the educational institutions that need incentives to offer courses in skills employers need, the workers, too, need incentives that a decent future awaits them, if they make the effort to be retrained.
It’s not just technical skills that employers look for. The so-called soft skills – being able to work as a team, being friendly and attentive to customers etc. – can be just as important to employers.
It’s a tough world. Good things come to those willing to adapt. How you adapt – and how you think about the future – could make all the difference in your success.
Peter

TURNING YOUR THINKING AROUND; PROBLEMS BECOME SOLUTIONS

#problems #solutions #PinkBat
Has a problem arisen for you? If so, do you just acknowledge it as a problem, and try to adjust accordingly?
Or, do you try to turn the problem, or problems, into a solution? It may require some creativity and imagination, but it will definitely require an open mind.
Michael McMillan discusses this concept in his book, “Pink Bat: Turning Problems Into Solutions.”
The Pink Bat has become McMillan’s metaphor for a solution from a perceived problem. As a boy, he and his friends were looking for a way to play backyard baseball without breaking windows of their houses. They replaced a hard ball with a rubber ball. Then, McMillan remembered a gift he got as a child – a pink bat, designed to help toddlers learn baseball.
To condense a longer story, the pink bat broke from use, and the boys, with the help of one neighbor boy who didn’t usually play ball with the rest, came up with a new baseball-related game, using the broken pink bat.
“We’ve all heard the expression, ‘one man’s junk is another man’s treasure.’ If (the neighbor boy) could take a discarded bat (perceived problem) and turn it into an exciting new game (solution), then what’s stopping you from doing the same?” McMillan writes.
He goes on to write that subconsciously, our brain chooses what we believe is possible, plausible and “real,” while ignoring or blocking everything else. He gives the example of a person listening to others’ conversation, when he hears his name mentioned. His brain filters automatically tell him that his name is important, thus he listens more intently.
He cites a bunch of examples of “problems” turned into “Pink Bat” solutions. They include turning waste vegetable oil from restaurants into motor fuel, and turning the methane gas from cattle waste into fuel gas.
His point is that problems become solutions by different thinking. It’s been said by many experts that we become what we think about. If you see your life as a series of problems to endure, rather than solutions to help you thrive, you will be less happy and less prosperous.
Pity pots can be comfy, but they get us nowhere. Sometimes, we have to delve into what’s not comfortable to change our lives.
McMillan says every problem is a solution, waiting for the right person to find it. If you become a person willing to look, eventually you’ll turn a problem into a solution – for you and perhaps many others.
If you’re situation is not where you want it to be, and you see yourself as a solution finder looking for something good to check out, message me.
“You can live each day in a world filled with ‘problems,’ or rise each morning and embrace a world filled with unseen solutions … eager for you to find them,” McMillan writes.
So get up. Swing your Pink Bat. Rather than see the world as a group of unsolvable problems, look at ways YOU can create solutions from those problems. Be willing to look at things you never would have thought you would look at. You might be amazed at what you find.
“For every problem, there exists a solution … or at the very least … an opportunity. But it takes an open mind to see it … and intelligence and imagination to create it,” McMillan writes.
Perhaps it’s the outsider who sees something others have missed, he continues. Perhaps being an outsider, or going outside your comfort zone, may help you see what YOU might have missed had you not looked.
Peter

WORKING LONGER WILL MAKE YOU SICKER

#RaisingTheRetirementAge #retirement #WorkingLonger #disabilities
The government continues to raise the retirement age.
People are working longer.
Yet, their health continues to decline.
Ben Steverman discussed this in an article for Bloomberg News. It was also published Oct. 24, 2017, in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
“The age-adjusted mortality rate in the U.S. rose 1.2 percent from 2014 to 2015, according to the Society of Actuaries,” the article reads. “That’s the first year-over-year increase since 2005, and only the second rise greater than 1 percent since 1980,” the article says.
So, Americans are retiring later, dying sooner and are sicker, the article says.
Almost one in three Americans age 65 to 69 is still working, along with almost one in five in their early 70s, the article says.
Americans in their late 50s have more serious health problems than people of those same ages 10 to 15 years ago, according to the article. To boot, cognitive skills have declined. Those with a retirement age of 66, 11 percent already have had some kind of dementia between ages 58 and 60, the article quotes a study by University of Michigan economists HwaJung Choi and Robert Schoeni.
Experts say obesity, high rates of suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol abuse have been cited as causes, the article says.
The higher death rates are good news for pension plans, the article points out.
“Americans may have already seen most of the benefits from previous positive developments that cut the death rate, such as a decline in smoking and medical advances like statins that fight cardiovascular disease,” the article reads.
So are you among the group that feels worse than you think you should for your age? Has the economic downturn of 2008 got you working at a job you hate, when it’s high time for you to retire?
Perhaps a solution to the latter problem may relieve the difficulties of the former. There are many ways to make money beyond a traditional W-2 job – especially one that you hate, or that is making you sick. To check out one of the best such vehicles, message me.
And though pension plans may like this news – the Society of Actuaries calculates a typical pension plan’s obligations could fall by 0.7 to 1 percent , the article says – not everyone is fortunate enough to have a pension.
That puts the onus on every worker to make sure their retirement is not only survivable, but potentially prosperous.
This may entail some thought outside the proverbial box, especially if your employer is not providing you a pension.
If you’re young, start saving your money sooner. Cut out that extra coffee-shop visit or extra meal out, and put that money toward your retirement.
If you are older, not only must you think about how long you WANT to work, but also how long you will BE ABLE to work. It may not be an illness that gets you. You may be one bad manager or one reorganization away from a dead career.
You may not be able to solve health problems, but money problems can be conquered. You just have to have the best life you can, and try to live as long as possible.
Peter

HOW ABOUT ANYONE DOING ANY JOB?

More men are expected to be attracted to “women’s jobs” in the coming years.
However, the reverse is not proving to be a trend.
That’s according to research by Jed Kolko, economist at the job-search site Indeed. His study was quoted in an article by Ana Swanson in the Washington Post. It was also published in the April 23, 2017, edition of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Kolko concludes that less-educated men may especially face challenges in the job market of the future, the article says.
“In recent decades, fields that are dominated by men and by women have not fared equally. Many men have fallen out of work as increased mechanization has allowed the U.S. to produce more agricultural and manufacturing goods than ever, with fewer people than before,” the article says.
“Jobs that are dominated by women are projected to grow nearly twice as fast as jobs that are dominated by men,” the article quotes the Kolko study, based on figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
“Fast-growing ‘male’ jobs that require lots of education don’t really help men without a college degree who have been in traditionally ‘male’ jobs,” the article quotes Kolko.
We all have an idea what a “male” job – construction, manufacturing, mining, farming etc. –or a “female job” – nursing, administrative assistant, etc. –is. The article says that computer programming was once dominated by women, but is now heavily male.
It’s been reported many times that men fared worse in the Great Recession than women. The good jobs done largely by men went away more quickly than those done mostly by women.
Kolko points out that some “female” jobs, such as telephone operaters and textile workers, also have been automated out, according to the article.
The broader trend is away from manufacturing and more toward services, which could draw men into jobs traditionally dominated by women, the article says.
So let’s step back and examine this. Good jobs in general are disappearing quickly. Lots of folks, if they are lucky to find new jobs, generally are getting paid less than their previous jobs paid them. Many are not using the skills they were trained for. Those skills, largely, are being replaced by machines. There’s nothing a person can do to stop that!
But what a person CAN do is think about other ways to make money. There are many such vehicles out there for those willing to step out of what’s comfortable, and look at something different. To learn about one of the best such vehicles, message me.
The economy, the recession, downsizing – however you wish to think about it – is not something that will, or can, go away. So, if such circumstances hit you, don’t beat yourself up. Sure, those circumstances will hurt, but by further beating yourself, the pain will be worse.
Americans can be very resilient. Sometimes, tough circumstances require bold action. Sometimes, one has to think differently to better himself.
If you view yourself as a hard-working person, and most do, don’t expect someone to give you something. You may have to look for other opportunities, perhaps completely unrelated to what you’ve done before.
So whether you’ve been doing a “male” job, or a “female” job, and it has gone away, remember that someone you know, or may not yet know, may introduce you to something you may have never heard of. Listen. Don’t dismiss out of hand. You could be hearing about the light at the end of your tunnel.

Peter